Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Medieval Images of the Human Body

1
Wound Man
Wound Man
Wellcome Library
Wellcome Library
By the late 15th century the image of Wound Man became popular in medieval medical textbooks. It depict the various different ways someone could get injured in battle or by accident.
2
Parts of the Body
Parts of the Body
British Library
British Library
This 15th century medical text from Germany shows a man with various parts of the body described.
3
The Eye
The Eye
The 9th century scholar Hunayn ibn Ishaq wrote extensively about ophthalmology. This drawing of the eye is based on his works.
4
Performing an Anatomy
Performing an Anatomy
National Library of Medicine
National Library of Medicine
Johannes de Ketham was a German physician living in Italy at the end of the 15th century. In 1491, an Italian version of his book on anatomy was printed - it contains woodcut illustrations such as this showing a human anatomy about to take place.
5
Skeleton
Skeleton
National Library of Medicine
National Library of Medicine
This Persian treatise from c.1390 was by Mansur ibn Ilyas. He depicted the five 'systems' of the body: bones, nerves, muscles, veins, and arteries - each illustrated with a full-page diagram. Here is his image of a skeleton.
6
The Buttocks and Legs
The Buttocks and Legs
British Library
British Library
This medical treatise from 14th century England offers a marginal drawing illustrating a surgical procedure.
7
Veins and the Circulation System
Veins and the Circulation System
The 13th century surgeon Theodoric Borgognoni wrote the Cyrurgia, a four-volume work that greatly expanded medieval Europe's knowledge of medicine and surgery. From this work you can find this image of a human's circulation system.
8
Hand
Hand
British Library
British Library
The Liber Medicinarum, an early 15th century text, shows a diseased hand.
9
Pregnant Woman
Pregnant Woman
Wellcome Library
Wellcome Library
This text from c.1420 offers a full-figure anatomy of pregnant woman labelled with ailments.
10
Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci
The Renaissance scholar Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) was known for his interest in anatomy. He dissected several corpses, and made over 200 drawings based on what he saw.
11
Anatomy of the Brain
Anatomy of the Brain
University of Toronto
University of Toronto
The Anatomiæ by Johann Dryander, which was published in Germany in 1537, offers a series of illustrations depicting the dissection sequence of a head.

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